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    The Sheriff of Geneva

    Yes, Chef! The spitting tension and steamy press of a professional kitchen is fertile creative ground. Hard-boozing, hard-bonking and filthy-mouthed – there is something of the Viking raiding party about the average crew of chefs. Or so the cliche runs: the reality, of course, is a little different. …

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    The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti

      The text and prolific illustrations that make up The City Beneath provides a hundred-year cultural history of Los Angeles and its environs, from the hobos of the early twentieth century to modern-day taggers; an assertion of the very presence and existence of its marginalised visitors and inh …

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    Reflections: Preview of the photography book, Form

    A night class at the old school on top of Stow Hill in Trefforest would prove decisive. I had already experienced years of taking photographs, learning about cameras and darkrooms as a kid with my uncle Robert, later assisting professional photographers, then on to working part-time on social and in …

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    Pier Closing Time

    There is no such thing as realism. Photographers might choose to capture the gritty, the depressing, the down at heel, but they do so by selection, by manipulating tone, light, shadow, subject. There is only 1/30 of a second between a smiling face and a lost look, a cloud and a sunbeam. Then come in …

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    The Tall Owl and Other Stories

    Ed Garland’s book of criticism, bibliotherapy and memoir, Earwitness, which New Welsh Review published in 2019, raised my awareness of the neglected sense of sound in literature. Newcomer Colum Sanson-Regan is a musician, with two sole and two band albums under his belt (as well as having been a bod …

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    In the Sweep of the Bay

    The woman behind plate glass could not have been in their thoughts, they were not performing to impress and entertain her. Far out, they rode on the waves or sheer or at an angle through them and always only to try what they could do. In the din of waves and wind under that ripped-open sky they were …

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Explore the latest from the New Welsh Review

Green in Black

As a tribute to the late, great Cicely Tyson, Daniel G Williams writes about the African-American attraction to Emlyn Williams' film The Corn is Green, in which Ms Tyson appeared as Miss Moffat in a 1983 NYC revival

PUBLISHED ON: 03/02/21

CATEGORY: Essays

As a tribute to Cecily Tyson, who died on 28 January 2021, we re-publish this article from New Welsh Review 86, winter 2009. The year 2009 has seen a …

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Secret Britain: Unearthing Our Mysterious Past

Amy Aed discovers worlds and wonders right beneath her feet

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Secret Britain: Unearthing Our Mysterious Past is an informative, immersive book, into which the author weaves poetry, dusting old stories with magic. …

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The Worrier’s Guide to the End of the World: Love, Loss, and Other Catastrophes through Italy, India, and Beyond

Amy Aed discovers that she enjoys the philosophical moments of this travel title as much as its brutal honesty towards travel companions, its humour and its informal voice

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Torre DeRoche is one of the most immersive, enigmatic travel writers in the industry, blessed with an easy, relaxed form of prose. The Worrier’s Guide …

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Land of the Dawn-lit Mountains: A Journey across Arunachal Pradesh, India’s Forgotten Frontier

Amy Aed enjoys travel writing that restores human values, and discovers a remote state in north-eastern India

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Not only was Land of the Dawn-lit Mountains shortlisted for the 2018 Edward Stanford Travel Writing Award, but it has also been given high praise by o …

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The Works of Gwerful Mechain [A Broadview Anthology of British Literature edition]

Chris Moss notes that sex and the sacred were sweaty bedfellows in Medieval literature, and delights in these vivacious and deftly constructed translations that positively bounce along, shining a light on this worthy, if less prolific, rival to Chaucer and Dafydd ap Gwilym

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

As every schoolgirl or boy lucky enough to be introduced to Chaucer knows, sex and the sacred were sweaty bedfellows during the Medieval period. If th …

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South Wales Monuments and Transmissions, 1996–2004 and Not Still: Rhondda Photographs, by Paul Cabuts

Tim Cooke assesses two publications of the formidable, challenging and subversive Valleys photographs of Paul Cabuts

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Photo essay, Reviews

Not Still, the title of Paul Cabuts’s stunning collection of images of the Rhondda Valley, comes from Border Country, Raymond Williams’ classic novel …

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Dad’s Plot

A poem by Ellie Rees

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

You coaxed these tendrils clock-wise around each stick, secured them with string; now the vine’s once-youthful winding, nakedly exposed, is stiffer th …

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Welsh Writing in English, 1536–1914, The First Four Hundred Years (The Oxford Literary History of Wales: Volume 3)

Stephen Wade praises a book of sheer comprehensiveness, at once a compendious resource for reference use and a good read, packed with profiles of writers great and small, and with an emphasis on neglected or unknown female writers

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

In 1811, Harriet Browne wrote some original verse on folded sheets of paper, the subject being Deganwy Castle. Her Liverpool family moved to Denbighsh …

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