A Mind of Winter: Notes on Exile

As every immigrant knows, Rebecca Ruth Gould writes of the poet Ilya Kaminsky (and other exiles), everything you thought you knew, you have to learn all over again; best cultivate a ‘mind of winter’

PUBLISHED ON: 02/08/22

CATEGORY: Essays, Memoir

As every immigrant knows, Rebecca Ruth Gould writes of the poet Ilya Kaminsky (and other exiles), everything you thought you knew, you have to learn a …

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The Green Indian Problem, The Blue Book of Nebo

Tim Cooke admires two novels that make innovative use of epistolary forms written from the point of view of children, both firmly rooted in their Welsh locations and exploring themes of identity, change and the mother–child relationship

PUBLISHED ON: 28/06/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Writing in the first person from a child’s perspective is fraught with difficulty. Achieving an authentic language, delivering realistic insights and …

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Let Me Tell You What I Saw

Shara Atashi finds that the cruelty of war is a universal theme in this dual language Arabic-English long poem written by a soldier of the Iraq war, and makes broader comparisons with English and American war poetry and fiction

PUBLISHED ON: 30/03/22

CATEGORY: Essays, Reviews

The effect of this long poem (an abridged dual-language Arabic-English version of the 550-page poem ‘Uruk’s Anthem’) could be described as a shellshoc …

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Hafez and Jones: Poets United for Peace

Shara Atashi on the links between eighteenth-century polyglot William Jones and fourteenth-century Persian poet Hafez

PUBLISHED ON: 30/03/22

CATEGORY: Column

(Above) frieze at University College, Oxford chapel showing Sir William Jones taking notes from Hindi speakers and scholars, (top) roof of Hafez tomb …

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The Legend of Samad Behrangi, the Storyteller

Shara Atashi on Samad Behrangi, one of the most influential children’s authors of Iran, and campaigner against child poverty and for inclusivity

PUBLISHED ON: 01/03/22

CATEGORY: Column

If someday I should face death – as I surely will – it is not what matters. What does matter is what influence my life or death will have on the lives …

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Grand Larcenies: Translations and Imitations of Ten Dutch Poets

The translator’s aim is the creation of a natural artefact in the target language, Scott Emblen-Jarrett writes of this collection inspired by Minhinnick’s The Adulterer's Tongue

PUBLISHED ON: 01/03/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

As a translator, the question of untranslatability is a topic that I often find rearing its head, especially when it comes to poetry, a genre that for …

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Catullus: Shibari Carmina

Jemma L King advises, ‘when in Rome, join a fetish club’, as she marvels at an exciting, breathing, timeless new adaptation, aided by Japanese rope bondage

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

The term ‘confessional poet’ is obviously less of a descriptor and more of a slur, largely aimed at mid-century female writers. But go back far enough …

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Lady Charlotte Guest: The Exceptional Life of a Female Industrialist

Dr Wyn Thomas finds this a riveting and well-crafted account of an industrialist, philanthropist and the Mabinogi’s first editor and translator

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

I began reading Victoria Owen’s account of Lady Charlotte Guest, knowing little about Lady Charlotte and what she accomplished. On concluding the book …

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Odetta in Babylon and the Canada Express

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Published in 1968, twelve years after Allen Ginsberg’s Howl, Gregorio Kohon’s Odetta in Babylon and the Canada Express was, if not quite a landmark, t …

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Forms of Exile: Selected Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva

Filip Noubel admires a translation of a prolific Russian poet for whom exile is home

PUBLISHED ON: 08/11/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Poetry is the place where meaning remains an open question. When engaging with a poem, the reader is offered a rare gift: the freedom to interpret con …

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