Last month, a fellow writer contacted me. He found ‘the recent flowering of solo women walkers’ to be an interesting phenomenon and would appreciate my views. This comment was the last of so many pertaining to ‘women walking’ that have come my way in the nine years that I have been a hiker-who-writes, that I […]
To access this content, you must be a subscriber to New Welsh Review. Subscribe today Existing subscribers, log in to view this content.

The Long Field

Chris Moss on a memoir of place, full of ageless energy, where pink-lensed romance is balanced by reality

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

In the beginning the sky had more to offer. That’s where the action was, in the chaotic skyscape of west Wales. Cumulous banks, dazzling as airborne g …

Read more

South Wales Monuments and Transmissions, 1996–2004 and Not Still: Rhondda Photographs, by Paul Cabuts

Tim Cooke assesses two publications of the formidable, challenging and subversive Valleys photographs of Paul Cabuts

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Photo essay, Reviews

Not Still, the title of Paul Cabuts’s stunning collection of images of the Rhondda Valley, comes from Border Country, Raymond Williams’ classic novel …

Read more

Mai by Georgia Ruth

Georgia Ruth proves in her new folk album Mai that she is on a steady upward trajectory

PUBLISHED ON: 15/11/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Evocation of locales that hold a personal connection to artists is a common feature in the medium of music. Rich soundscapes will frequently echo plac …

Read more

The Lives and Extraordinary Adventures of Fifteen Tramp Writers from the Golden Age of Vagabondage

Chris Moss finds that there is something romantic and true about the fourteen men and one woman who lived first, wrote afterwards, and saw in the tramping life a mode of being that was more meaningful than home-focused domestic existence

PUBLISHED ON: 03/11/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Jim Phelan, in collection of Ian Cutler   An extensive list of words for people of no fixed abode in the introduction to this book reminds us how …

Read more

We Could Be Anywhere by Now

Katherine Stansfield’s latest poetry collection is a perceptive, humorous exploration of identity, language, and the boons and pitfalls of relationships, Luanne Thornton writes

PUBLISHED ON: 20/08/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

The poems in Katherine Stanfield’s second collection bristle with curiosity and the desire to understand the world through personal experience. Embedd …

Read more

Telling your father at Bwlch Nant yr Arian

Poem by Mari Ellis Dunning

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

                  We’re going to have a baby, I told your father, just days since I’d felt his ribs slot like coins between mine. We were toeing a mou …

Read more

Algorithm

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

i.m. Michael Wessells   The phone rings because Michael has died. I saw him yesterday and said goodbye as he passed behind me, tall, gathering hi …

Read more

Where We Live Now: Covid Toponyms

How names helped Sarah Tanburn find her way during a Cardiff lockdown

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Column

[We] read in place-names a record of important events and reconstruct something of the culture of the namers at the time they assigned names to the pl …

Read more

Shattercone

Places seem to connect with each other more successfully than do people in this follow-up interconnected story collection, writes Jacob Powell

PUBLISHED ON: 29/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Shattercone is the second collection of linked short stories by author Tristan Hughes, and includes a number that have been previously published. All …

Read more