We’re going to have a baby, I told your father, just days since I’d felt his ribs slot like coins between mine. We were toeing a mountain trail, me dancing towards the edges, him gripping the cliff face like a scattering fern. He stopped, looked out at […]
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Rivers Joining

Poem by Graham Mort

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

Freshwater mussels, coffee bean brown, cleaned by oyster catchers that jostle where the Wenning brunts the Lune. We gaze upstream at the Howgills, the …

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Who is Briton Tom? Interview with Robert Minhinnick in Porthcawl

Llŷr Gwyn goes on foot with the poet, from Porthcawl’s Bucaneer pub, through Trecco Bay, to the dunes, and finds out about how Robert Minhinnick is pursued by sand, ‘saving the bunny rabbits’, imposter syndrome, archaeology, the Blair glory years for the arts, a fear of things being obliterated, and the importance of a chorus to a poem

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Interview

This interview, conducted in English, was originally published in Welsh (‘Tywod Porthcawl:  Mynd am Dro gyda Robert Minhinnick’) in O’r Pedwar Gwynt ( …

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Saints and Lodgers: Poems of WH Davies

Chris Moss identifies something of Newport in the original Supertramp who belonged to no poetry school

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

I am the Poet Davies, William, I sin without a blush or blink: I am a man that lives to eat; I am a man that lives to drink   Thus, with the easy …

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Where We Live Now: Covid Toponyms

How names helped Sarah Tanburn find her way during a Cardiff lockdown

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Column

[We] read in place-names a record of important events and reconstruct something of the culture of the namers at the time they assigned names to the pl …

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Under the Stars: A Journey into Light

What starts as a roam across Britain and between shade and night, soon becomes, Alex Diggins concludes, an impressive polemic on the need to preserve darkness and hold back the encroachment of artificial light

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Years ago, somewhere between childhood and maturity, I took to night walking. We lived at that time in a village on the edge of the Somerset countrysi …

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Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation

Here is the antidote to nature writing, Chris Moss argues, hailing speculative writers who revel in all manner of vile secretions and evil intentions belonging to the plant world

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Bursting bandwagon or hayrick of universal hope, nature writing has a pretty unequivocal message: nature is benign, greenery is good, and all the evil …

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Footnotes to Water

Desi Tsvetkova is fascinated by a poetry collection that explores threatened tongues through giving voice to culverted rivers in Bangor and Paris, and touches on themes of lost heritage, herd mentality and cultural pollution

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Zoë Skoulding is a poet and translator whose newest collection with Seren deals with bodies of water and how they connect to people’s lives. Footnotes …

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Wing

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Nature takes centre stage in Matthew Francis’ poetry collection, Wing. Published by Faber, it was The Guardian’s Poetry Book of The Month for February …

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The Price of the Picturesque

The package tour was invented in Wales. In the week the ‘travel ban’ is likely to be lifted, Chris Moss calls for a reinvention of Welsh tourism after coronavirus

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Opinion

The Emptying of Covid-19. It sounds like the title of a Thomas Pynchon novel. But for three long months, the skies cleared, the beaches were clean and …

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