Miner’s Day by BL Coombes, with illustrations [‘Rhondda images’] by Isabel Alexander; Peter Wakelin (ed) (Parthian) The Shadow of the Mine: Coal and the End of Industrial Britain by Huw Beynon and Ray Hudson (Verso) Representing the Male: Masculinity, Genre and Social Context in Six South Wales Novels by John Perrott Jenkins (UWP) Coal miners have […]
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Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation

Here is the antidote to nature writing, Chris Moss argues, hailing speculative writers who revel in all manner of vile secretions and evil intentions belonging to the plant world

PUBLISHED ON: 30/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Bursting bandwagon or hayrick of universal hope, nature writing has a pretty unequivocal message: nature is benign, greenery is good, and all the evil …

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Quo Vadis? And Why, Exactly?

Chris Moss

PUBLISHED ON: 01/09/17

CATEGORY: Essays

Homer’s heroes voyaged in search of love and war, to consult prophets, and challenge gods. The authors of the Old Testament constructed their narrativ …

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Celtic Myth in Contemporary Children’s Fantasy: Idealization, Identity, Ideology

Linda Rhinehart

PUBLISHED ON: 09/08/17

CATEGORY: Reviews

In her investigation of the use of Irish and Welsh mythology in literature for children in recent years, Dimitra Fimi discusses Pat O’Shea’s The Hound …

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Roald Dahl: Wales of the Unexpected

Roald Dahl spent the first nine years of his life in Llandaf, Cardiff. Despite this, Wales has been slow to identify the ‘Welsh Dahl’. This book rectifies that with a sparkling variety of inventive and productive approaches to the great author in his centenary year, including psychogeographical and psychanalytical, writes Liz Jones

PUBLISHED ON: 01/08/17

CATEGORY: Reviews

Roald Dahl is one of those rare writers whose name and work is instantly recognisable; his oeuvre(and his children’s fiction in particular) has sold o …

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Discovering Dylan Thomas

Amy McCauley thoroughly recommends Goodby’s commitment, demonstrated here, to a re-assessment of Thomas’ work, method and ‘process poetic’ celebrating jouissance, hybridity, proliferation and excess

PUBLISHED ON: 31/07/17

CATEGORY: Reviews

As a continuation of John Goodby’s argument for assessing Dylan Thomas’ work through the lens of the ‘process poetic’, this book is ‘more than just a …

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David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet

Suzannah V Evans enjoys an erudite and spirited biography which explores the question of why David Jones appears to be a ‘lost great modernist’

PUBLISHED ON: 31/07/17

CATEGORY: Reviews

TS Eliot called David Jones’ epic poem In Parenthesis ‘a work of genius’, while WH Auden considered it to be ‘the greatest book about the First World …

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Queer Wales: The History, Culture and Politics of Queer Life in Wales

Jane Doherty

PUBLISHED ON: 25/07/17

CATEGORY: Audio review, Audio review with transcript

Jane Docherty reviews Queer Wales: The History, Culture and Politics of Queer Life in Wales, a collection of essays edited by Huw Osborne. Published b …

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One Foot in the Water

Kieron Smith

PUBLISHED ON: 25/07/17

CATEGORY: Essays

Islands enjoy a prominent place in the Welsh imagination, so much so that we might call Wales an ‘islophiliac’ nation (Pete Hay). This is perhaps unde …

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Poetry and Privacy

Adam Hanna

PUBLISHED ON: 10/02/14

CATEGORY: Reviews

In an autobiographical anecdote in the introduction to this book of essays by the poet and critic John Redmond, its author tells a thought-provoking t …

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