Language is the sea in which the world and we ourselves swim. In a fascinating book the Israeli novelist, Amos Oz and his co-author (and daughter) Fania Oz-Salzberger, allude to an essential part of Jewish identity which is neither racial, religious nor nationalistic, and which they say is older, more integral and more influential than […]
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Losing Israel

Amy McCauley admires a highly eloquent and thoughtful meditation on what it means to exist in history and as a product of history within a deeply political and strikingly personal and superior memoir

PUBLISHED ON: 01/08/15

CATEGORY: Reviews

A complex, multi-layered and ambitious book, Losing Israel isn’t your average ‘memoir’ by any stretch of the imagination. In one sense, the book isn’t …

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Judas

Amy McCauley applauds effortless mastery of voice, finely tuned rhythms and a keen sense of place, but asks whether employing a greater range of tone through a wider range of characters’ voices would have pushed this poet beyond his comfort zone

PUBLISHED ON: 01/08/15

CATEGORY: Reviews

The forty-seven poems in Judas are unmistakeably and emphatically the work of Damian Walford Davies. Yes, this statement sounds rather odd – insincere …

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Cosmic Latte

Penny Simpson

PUBLISHED ON: 26/08/13

CATEGORY: Reviews

In her second short fiction collection, Trezise maps contrasting countries and cultures, from a nail parlour in the Valleys to a reform school in Isra …

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