Cities are hip. Towns are gritty. Hamlets are romantic. Capitals are – snooty accent coming – capital. Villages are problematic. What do you think of when someone says ‘village’. Idiots? A green, for men in whites playing cricket? No shops, no post office, no BAMEs, no youth? Perhaps nimbys, or twee cottages, or gossip and […]
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Hafez and Jones: Poets United for Peace

Shara Atashi on the links between eighteenth-century polyglot William Jones and fourteenth-century Persian poet Hafez

PUBLISHED ON: 30/03/22

CATEGORY: Column

(Above) frieze at University College, Oxford chapel showing Sir William Jones taking notes from Hindi speakers and scholars, (top) roof of Hafez tomb …

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The Making – and Unmanning – of the Welsh Collier

A comparative history, a repackaged work of nonfiction and an essay collection provide a rich seam of reflections, writes Chris Moss in this feature-length review-essay

PUBLISHED ON: 30/03/22

CATEGORY: Essays, Reviews

MIners’ houses, Trealaw, Rhondda Valley by Isabel Alexander, from Miner’s Day.   Miner’s Day by BL Coombes, with illustrations [‘Rhondda images’] …

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The Bloodless Boy

This meticulously researched Restoration whodunit has prescient themes of extremist politics, political instability and corruption at the highest level, writes Liz Jones

PUBLISHED ON: 01/03/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

London, New Year’s Day 1678, twelve years after the Great Fire and eighteen since the fall of Oliver Cromwell’s republic and the restoration of the mo …

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Lady Charlotte Guest: The Exceptional Life of a Female Industrialist

Dr Wyn Thomas finds this a riveting and well-crafted account of an industrialist, philanthropist and the Mabinogi’s first editor and translator

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

I began reading Victoria Owen’s account of Lady Charlotte Guest, knowing little about Lady Charlotte and what she accomplished. On concluding the book …

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Anna Falcini’s In Between the Folds Are Particles, Aberystwyth Arts Centre

Claire Pickard on an exhibition, based on research into Gwen John’s letters and diaries, which explores projection, performance, subjectivity and the unreachable nature of past experience

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Column

The genesis of Anna Falcini’s In Between the Folds Are Particles was her research into Gwen John’s letters and diaries as part of a residency at the A …

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Odetta in Babylon and the Canada Express

PUBLISHED ON: 25/01/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Published in 1968, twelve years after Allen Ginsberg’s Howl, Gregorio Kohon’s Odetta in Babylon and the Canada Express was, if not quite a landmark, t …

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The History of Wales in Twelve Poems, A Last Respect: The Roland Mathias Prize Anthology of Contemporary Welsh Poetry

Chris Moss on two anthologies which prove that Welsh poetry in English is in robust health

PUBLISHED ON: 01/11/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

The art of the poetry anthology is a competitive arena. You have the celeb selections (Amis on Larkin, Cerys Matthews on her whims), the ‘authoritativ …

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The Queen of Romance, Marguerite Jervis: A Biography by Liz Jones

Bookclub chaired by Natalia Elliot discussing The Queen of Romance by Liz Jones, a biography of Marguerite Jervis

PUBLISHED ON: 27/07/21

CATEGORY: Bookclub video

Bookclub discussing the biography, The Queen of Romance, by Liz Jones, about the mass-selling romance novelist Marguerite Jervis (1886-1964), who was …

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Hana

Chris Moss respects an imperfect novel about intergenerational trauma in wartime and Soviet Czech life, noting silence at contrapuntal play with booming survival guilt

PUBLISHED ON: 19/05/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

When a typhoid epidemic tears through the small town of Meziříčíin in 1953, nine-year-old Mira is orphaned and forced to turn to her aunt Hana. A woma …

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