I am at the stony beach by the river with both sons. They are old enough not to be eating stones anymore. They have a net to fish for fish, and for stones and are a babble of river, fish and stones. I find a stone ground smooth. I turn it in my fingers, feel […]
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Secret Britain: Unearthing Our Mysterious Past

Amy Aed discovers worlds and wonders right beneath her feet

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Secret Britain: Unearthing Our Mysterious Past is an informative, immersive book, into which the author weaves poetry, dusting old stories with magic. …

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The Worrier’s Guide to the End of the World: Love, Loss, and Other Catastrophes through Italy, India, and Beyond

Amy Aed discovers that she enjoys the philosophical moments of this travel title as much as its brutal honesty towards travel companions, its humour and its informal voice

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Torre DeRoche is one of the most immersive, enigmatic travel writers in the industry, blessed with an easy, relaxed form of prose. The Worrier’s Guide …

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Land of the Dawn-lit Mountains: A Journey across Arunachal Pradesh, India’s Forgotten Frontier

Amy Aed enjoys travel writing that restores human values, and discovers a remote state in north-eastern India

PUBLISHED ON: 27/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Not only was Land of the Dawn-lit Mountains shortlisted for the 2018 Edward Stanford Travel Writing Award, but it has also been given high praise by o …

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Welsh Writing in English, 1536–1914, The First Four Hundred Years (The Oxford Literary History of Wales: Volume 3)

Stephen Wade praises a book of sheer comprehensiveness, at once a compendious resource for reference use and a good read, packed with profiles of writers great and small, and with an emphasis on neglected or unknown female writers

PUBLISHED ON: 26/01/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

In 1811, Harriet Browne wrote some original verse on folded sheets of paper, the subject being Deganwy Castle. Her Liverpool family moved to Denbighsh …

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From Love Bugs to Period Taboos: Kendal Mountain Festival 2

Amy Aed’s second report from the festival’s varied fare, from veteran married entomoligists on film, UK period poverty and Nepalise menstrual taboos, cooped-up British children and feminist adventurers

PUBLISHED ON: 08/12/20

CATEGORY: Adventure, Blog

The Kendal Mountain Festival showcases some of the most influential explorers, books, and films in the industry. One of the many documentary features …

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Tough Women: Kendal Mountain Festival

Amy And delights in an event and book which readdresses the toxic male image problem of travel, exploration and adventure writing

PUBLISHED ON: 25/11/20

CATEGORY: Blog, Travel

The Kendal Mountain Festival is on now and on demand until 31 December 2020. Tickets from £5.50, with some free events.  On Friday 20 November at the …

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Wild Persistence

Vicky MacKenzie admires a poetry collection of humour and revelry, lit by the repeated flare of violence and warmed by the unapologetic need to live the life of one’s own choosing

PUBLISHED ON: 03/11/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

From the very first line, ‘A joy of noise’, there’s humour and revelry in Katrina Naomi’s third full-length collection. There’s pleasure taken in a lo …

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Retired

Poem by Mandy Sutter

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

When my parents went back to their roots, to low ceilinged views of a pub with ducks, a shop, a Cotswold stone church, painstakingly restored   t …

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The eighteenth year of us

Poem by KS Moore

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

The clementine rise of new acquaintance: you were all lilt, all eye-bright charm – the dance of an autumn. And the fire breathed yes and now and I wan …

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