Many families have a mythic figure somewhere down the line. Mythic in this context, though, usually means larger than life. They are the relative or ancestors talked about at family get-togethers, their exploits recounted endlessly, typically exaggerated beyond recognition. Yet the mythic status conferred on Manuel Mena, the elusive subject of Spanish writer Javier Cercas’ […]
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The Queen of Romance, Marguerite Jervis: A Biography by Liz Jones

Bookclub chaired by Natalia Elliot discussing The Queen of Romance by Liz Jones, a biography of Marguerite Jervis

PUBLISHED ON: 27/07/21

CATEGORY: Bookclub video

Bookclub discussing the biography, The Queen of Romance, by Liz Jones, about the mass-selling romance novelist Marguerite Jervis (1886-1964), who was …

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Under the Thumbs

Poem by Rob Miles

PUBLISHED ON: 22/07/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

Just above the water: my ten toes. A distinct arch in a hot heaven of foam. Both little toes particularly little, noticeably curled. The next equally …

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My Ancestors are Deader than your Ancestors

Poem by Hannah Linden

PUBLISHED ON: 22/07/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

 We are a family of murderers – we murder our dead, put them in deeper graves than most people do.   We don’t want our dead to talk. We don’t wan …

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Breathing is the Loudest Thing

Poem by Sophia Nicholson

PUBLISHED ON: 03/05/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

The clock crawls loudly to 6pm, so                     …

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The Little House

Poem about secrets and bereavement by Jodie Hollander

PUBLISHED ON: 01/04/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

The little house I visit in my dreams is not the same place where I was born; no, this place is much further from town in an unfamiliar neighbourhood …

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Skimming a Stone

A poem by Charlie Bird about relationship breakdown

PUBLISHED ON: 01/04/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

I am at the stony beach by the river with both sons. They are old enough not to be eating stones anymore. They have a net to fish for fish, and for st …

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The Distance

Set in apartheid South Africa, this allegory of boxing, blood and brotherhood, writes Chris Moss, ripples with meanings and possibilities, is full of grace and tenderness, and demonstrates the light touch of a prose master

PUBLISHED ON: 03/11/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Great boxing matches are ‘allegories authored in blood’, wrote Budd Schulberg. It’s quoted late on in Ivan Vladislavíc’s sixth novel, which, among oth …

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My Mother Taught Me How to Sing and Graveyards in My Closet

Alex Diggins finds that these two creative radio pieces, an unabashed celebration of sound, music, motherhood and fulfilling Charlotte Church dreams, are epic as well as bang up to date

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Welsh boys and their mothers, eh? A cup of milky tea, a hunk of barabrith and mammy’s becardiganed cwtch – these have a Proustian ability to melt the …

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Kidnapped by my Father: BBC One Wales

Chris Moss hails an honest, crafted and true documentary about an indomitable Cardiff woman, a first-hand account of why immigration happens, and the long stories behind every tearful airport reunion

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Yemen is one of the world’s shadowlands. We only see it on the news, usually under a pall of smoke after mortars or aerial bombings. It’s a source of …

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