The first volume of a two-book series devoted to Welsh writing for the theatre,  A Dirty Broth, contains the complete texts of just three plays. You might think that an unrepresentative selection, but nonconformism, bilingualism, a small and relatively rural population, the so-called Treachery of the Blue Books (Brad y Llyfrau Gleision), and a porous border […]
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How to Carry Fire

In this second collection, the poet uses symbols of fire and water to navigate trauma and recovery, Luanne Thornton writes

PUBLISHED ON: 29/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Christina Thatcher’s How to Carry Fire recognises the rich potential of symbolising fire, and skilfully uses it to explore trauma in her second collec …

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The Short Knife

With its plot twist worthy of George RR Martin, Desi Tsvetkova enjoys this children’s novel set during Britain’s shift of power from Celtic Roman to Anglo-Saxon

PUBLISHED ON: 16/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Elen Caldecott is an author with an arsenal of children’s books to her name, though she has also worked in a variety of different fields, including ar …

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Impeccable

The crime thriller Impeccable by Jameel Sandham shares territory with Breaking Bad and Trainspotting. Desi Tsvetkova investigates

PUBLISHED ON: 16/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Jameel Sandham’s self-published crime thriller, Impeccable, eerily reminiscent of Ivrine Welsh’s best-selling hit Trainspotting, offers a gritty depic …

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Hey, Bert

Desi Tsvetokova admires a poetry collection about being choked by past trauma and letting go of it

PUBLISHED ON: 02/03/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

In 2019, Roberto Pastore published his first poetry collection, entitled Hey, Bert. There’s a beautiful toucan illustrated on the cover, standing atop …

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Long Pass by Joey Connolly

Suzannah V Evans

PUBLISHED ON: 11/02/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Connolly is out to win it all in this first poetry collection championing the ephemeral and the percussive, Suzannah V Evans writes Joey Connolly’s fi …

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No Far Shore: Charting Unknown Waters

Jane MacNamee is impressed by this travel memoir forming a coastal odyssey, haunted by absent parents and far gazes

PUBLISHED ON: 29/01/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

‘So, what was it actually like,’ asks Anne-Marie Fyfe, ‘growing up on the edge of something vast and exciting, on the edge of both calm and danger?’ B …

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Sliced Tongue and Pearl Cufflinks

Georgia Fearn is captivated by a dark collection, about the mother-daughter relationship, that makes you grieve for something you did not know you had lost

PUBLISHED ON: 29/01/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Kittie Belltree’s words, ‘so deep, so dark and dislocating, in the first poem of this collection, are no exaggeration. Reading it in one sitting evoke …

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The House Without Windows

Jane MacNamee on a girl, wise beyond her years, who has much to teach us about how inseparable humanity is from nature

PUBLISHED ON: 29/01/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

This is the enchanting tale of Eepersip, a rather lonely little girl who lives with her parents in the foothills of Mount Varcrobis. One day, she deci …

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The BBC National Short Story Award 2019 anthology

Dafydd Harvey reviews an anthology of the shortlist for this prize, now in its fourteenth year and presenting the work of five women; the winner of this £15,000 prize was Wales’ Jo Lloyd

PUBLISHED ON: 29/10/19

CATEGORY: Reviews

‘The Children’ by Lucy Caldwell First, in order of appearance, is Caldwell’s The Children which centres on a writer’s research for a story about Carol …

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