The Distance

Set in apartheid South Africa, this allegory of boxing, blood and brotherhood, writes Chris Moss, ripples with meanings and possibilities, is full of grace and tenderness, and demonstrates the light touch of a prose master

PUBLISHED ON: 03/11/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Great boxing matches are ‘allegories authored in blood’, wrote Budd Schulberg. It’s quoted late on in Ivan Vladislavíc’s sixth novel, which, among oth …

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My Mother Taught Me How to Sing and Graveyards in My Closet

Alex Diggins finds that these two creative radio pieces, an unabashed celebration of sound, music, motherhood and fulfilling Charlotte Church dreams, are epic as well as bang up to date

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Welsh boys and their mothers, eh? A cup of milky tea, a hunk of barabrith and mammy’s becardiganed cwtch – these have a Proustian ability to melt the …

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Kidnapped by my Father: BBC One Wales

Chris Moss hails an honest, crafted and true documentary about an indomitable Cardiff woman, a first-hand account of why immigration happens, and the long stories behind every tearful airport reunion

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Yemen is one of the world’s shadowlands. We only see it on the news, usually under a pall of smoke after mortars or aerial bombings. It’s a source of …

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Early Twentieth-century Welsh Plays in English, Vol 1: ‘A Dirty Broth’

Chris Moss assesses how this anthology of classic plays (including Taffy by Caradoc Evans) identifies the factors that deprived Wales of a recognisable tradition of playwriting and how these three plays share themes of religion, community, identity and family

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

The first volume of a two-book series devoted to Welsh writing for the theatre,  A Dirty Broth, contains the complete texts of just three plays. You m …

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How to Carry Fire

In this second collection, the poet uses symbols of fire and water to navigate trauma and recovery, Luanne Thornton writes

PUBLISHED ON: 29/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Christina Thatcher’s How to Carry Fire recognises the rich potential of symbolising fire, and skilfully uses it to explore trauma in her second collec …

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The Short Knife

With its plot twist worthy of George RR Martin, Desi Tsvetkova enjoys this children’s novel set during Britain’s shift of power from Celtic Roman to Anglo-Saxon

PUBLISHED ON: 16/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Elen Caldecott is an author with an arsenal of children’s books to her name, though she has also worked in a variety of different fields, including ar …

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Impeccable

The crime thriller Impeccable by Jameel Sandham shares territory with Breaking Bad and Trainspotting. Desi Tsvetkova investigates

PUBLISHED ON: 16/06/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Jameel Sandham’s self-published crime thriller, Impeccable, eerily reminiscent of Ivrine Welsh’s best-selling hit Trainspotting, offers a gritty depic …

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Hey, Bert

Desi Tsvetokova admires a poetry collection about being choked by past trauma and letting go of it

PUBLISHED ON: 02/03/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

In 2019, Roberto Pastore published his first poetry collection, entitled Hey, Bert. There’s a beautiful toucan illustrated on the cover, standing atop …

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Long Pass by Joey Connolly

Suzannah V Evans

PUBLISHED ON: 11/02/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Joey Connolly’s first collection Long Pass, published by Carcanet earlier this year, explores the limits and joys of language with exuberance and pana …

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No Far Shore: Charting Unknown Waters

Jane MacNamee is impressed by this travel memoir forming a coastal odyssey, haunted by absent parents and far gazes

PUBLISHED ON: 29/01/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

‘So, what was it actually like,’ asks Anne-Marie Fyfe, ‘growing up on the edge of something vast and exciting, on the edge of both calm and danger?’ B …

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