Creative work from NWR

Short stories, poems...

The Road (Issue: 117)

‘The Road’ opens Angela Graham’s short-fiction collection, A City Burning, which she completed in 2017 with the aid of a Writer’s Bursary from Literature Wales (supported by the National Lottery through the Arts Council of Wales).
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The Life of Almost (Issue: 117)

Novel Preview by Anna Vaught
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Photograph (Issue: 117)

Arthur squatted by the fireplace to warm his hands. The room felt comfortable for the first time he could remember – with sunlight streaming through the windows now that the heavy curtains and lace had been stripped away.
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Old Forgotten Things (Issue: 117)

As you’d expect, Harry was pleased as pie to see his daughter and grandson. But between you, me and these walls, the first of these, Seroca, got on my nerves, while the second, Cosmo, drove me up the wall. I could hardly show my true feelings, though, could I, in front of Harry?
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The Pavement Poet (Issue: 117)

It’s the last day of the month and I still have money in the bank, and I can’t help but feel that I’ve somehow failed at life. I make the most of it by getting a halloumi slammer and a raw coconut cacao bar for lunch, and I send Erin a picture to show her how I’m always eating vegan.

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Gower Photo Essay (Issue: 117)

Philip Griffiths is a photographer working for NB:Design, nb-design.com.
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Infirmarian (Issue: 116)

This first-person narrative creates with impressive detail the sequestered but very active world of a medieval Welsh monastery.
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Against the Current (Issue: 116)

Gwen Davies' translation of Caryl Lewis' 'Y Llif'
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Smugglers' Tunnel (Issue: 116)

A historical tale of nineteenth- and twenty-first-century Cardiff that takes some surprising twists and turns, charting the journey of a young man struggling to escape the shadow of his late father.
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The Night Where You No Longer Live (Issue: 116)

A first-person dark European fairytale about abuse, cross-dressing and Claudette’s desperate attempts to escape a cruel, dead father’s shadow and a living brother’s evil intent.
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The Seal (Issue: 116)

This is the story of unequal power, and the grooming of an eleven-year-old girl by a nineteen-year-old male.
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The Plankton Collector (Issue: 116)

This combination of magical realism and a realistic tale has the sense of being a gentle pastiche of an idyllic world populated by archetypes who will help us heal and learn.
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Boystown, SA (Issue: 115)

Told by a husband to his writer wife. Due to family rift and addiction, Robert Oosthuizen was brought up in South Africa by his grandmother, mother, foster homes and residential schools, including the highly democratic catholic Boystown.
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On Shifting Sands (Issue: 115)

Another true tale of family rift and reconciliation. The author was estranged as a girl from her troubled, glamourous mother, the death of whose sister Ruth damages generations.
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The Red Circle (Issue: 115)

A daughter’s Pennsylvania road trip with her Italian-American father is taken to help reconcile him with his mother.
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People, Places and Things: A Life with the Cold War (Issue: 115)

This memoir paints a sweeping landscape of the Eastern Bloc as experienced through the eyes of a British backpacker.
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The Case (Issue: 115)

Jim Neat is the author’s father, of whom she knew very little. Here she pieces together his early life through records, family history and imagination.
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My Oxford (Issue: 115)

A young woman’s experience of anorexia while at Oxford University enriches a lively account of student life with literary, philosophical and existential questions.
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Object (Issue: 114)

He struck the limpet with the bronze socket of the knife, a crisp sudden movement, his free hand following the shell automatically as it loosed away from the rock.
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Almost (Issue: 114)

My dad, Darwin Andrews, was the first black mayor in Britain. He was also the first Muslim mayor in Britain.
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Some Kind of Immortality (Issue: 114)

This is the second time with this one – let's call her Alice – belts and braces, she needs to make sure it works. Though, for my part, there’s never been a problem.
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Pencil Case (Issue: 113)

Pencil Case
How did it go, love? she says, and he nods and shrugs the way he does and goes upstairs to his room and takes the pencil case out of his bag and puts it in its place on his desk. He puts the other things in their places too, and then sits hun
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Theory and Design in the Age of Innocence (Issue: 113)

We walked to a tree. The sun through its leaves and branches was warm on my skin. We looked at one of the things hanging on it.

‘Right,’ he said, ‘find a name for that.’
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The Palestinian (Issue: 113)

The white arse?

Three words on a piece of paper. That’s what the old man called the
bird. So I did too. The only time I saw it was in the Gwter Gryn with cliffs on three sides. Not a good place for the tide to catch you.
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No Situation is Permanent (Issue: 112)

Buduburam returns to me in a series of images, scents and sounds: the one- storey buildings as daubs of colour in varying states of decay; the Liberian women in fishtail skirts showing off high heels that kick up red dust as they walk.
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Moscow to Beijing on Train Number Four (Issue: 112)

I hate being cold and would happily live somewhere with permanent summer time. I can get chilly in Cardiff in July.
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Seven Days: A Pyrenean Trek (Issue: 112)

Our destination was not a holy mountain. We knew that the car was the end of the journey as a whole. We would do a couple of peaks, meet incredible people but there was no particular goal.
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Extract: Stranger Shores (Issue: 112)

The main road through Mahahual runs past the hotel, a thin track of tarmac with thin drifts of sand nudging out from the high curbs.
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Extract: The Rains of Titikaka (Issue: 112)

Soon I would see Bolivian land for the first time and my eyes were greedy to make sense of it, to start feeling and recording what it was. Irregularly shaped fields appeared, without crops, studded by stone mounds like shield bosses.
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Bush Meat: As My Mother Told Me (Issue: 112)

Day after day, a boy tends his cows and watches the sky. The grass is brown; the animals dying; the trees unable to put forth leaves. The clouds cast shadows but release no rain. One day, an eagle flies over- head and a feather floats to the ground. The b
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Three or Four Kilos of Flesh (Issue: 111)

In my life there is a before and an after. A day that cuts my life in two. In my life, as in all lives, there are happy dates and sad dates. Births and deaths.
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Rock Lobster (Issue: 111)

What are the chances? A row of arcade reels, five dancing lobsters with a bell ringing a blinder above the music. A cartoon fisherman in his orange bib, emptying pots – Buddy, this won’t hurt, I promise ya! – swinging them about with his left hand u
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Extract: The Vegetarian Tigers of Paradise (Issue: 111)

Most of the time Mum will use horror films to frighten us. Like when she said that Freddy Krueger sometimes hides in the drains, and if we’re not careful he’ll creep his knife-fingers up through the toilet water
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Somersault: Coming of Age Memoir (Issue: 110)

This year it turned ten years since my last in school. It was the year of new driving licenses, Stax soul, and Liverpool’s epic Champions League comeback against AC Milan
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My Bukowski (Issue: 109)

There’s this guy. He must be around fifty, maybe fifty-five. I don’t know if he’s homeless or what. He hangs out in the lanes behind Whitchurch Road, by the allotments.
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Desire Line (Issue: 107)

Ok. We need to start a long way from now. So Sara married a man called Josh and they had a daughter – named Eurwen, a Welsh name, a difficult name but to look at her, you’d never guess she’s going to cause the trouble we’re all in.
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My Falling Down House (Issue: 107)

My father says I’m an idealist, and that this will be my downfall. I disagree.
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An Elephant in Aberaeron (Issue: 107)

There was, apparently, an elephant buried somewhere in Aberaeron.
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Sker (Issue: 106)

How can this be? I search but she is
already gone.
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Plunder (Issue: 105)

Eight labourer’s cottages. Knuckled and whitewashed and damp. Sunday trew for the job, and his only pair with pockets at that.
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The River’s Mutterings (Issue: 104)

Jack Smylie Wild goes in search of waterways that inspired Dylan Thomas
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The Key (Issue: 104)

Story by Jo Mazelis
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White Food (Issue: 104)

New story by Kate Hamer.
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Dangerous Asylums (Issue: 104)

Rob Mimpriss showcases fiction inspired by a hundred years of records at Denbigh mental hospital.
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The Collector (Issue: 103)

Dan Anthony's narrator collects stories written on serviettes in an Alicante cafe, stories of Karl-Heinz's onanism and its effect of Pepito the dog, and Luis the painter of plein-air painters.
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The Munificence of the Brittany Sun (Issue: 103)

She had been watching him for years. He went straight into the water, swam one hundred metres out to the rocks, returned and dried himself. He looked at his watch, timed himself fifteen minutes on his front, fifteen on his back, put on his linen shirt, st
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Snakes and Ladders (Issue: 103)

In Ellie Rees' moving, mature memoir the landscapes of the Bristol Channel evoke tragedy and awaken a writer
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Two White, One Blue (Issue: 103)

New short story by Alan Bilton.
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Johnny Dangerously (Issue: 103)

New short story by Lisa Blower
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Split Me In Two, Gareth Moon (Issue: 103)

New short story by Crystal Jeans.
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Eclipse (Issue: 102)

Violets and primroses have powered up between the paving stones of Beth’s London garden.
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Mourning (Issue: 102)

The TV, radio and newspapers weren't calling it genocide. It was as though they were keeping the word for more important things. The word was too strong. Too strong for Africa.
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A Shard of Memory (Issue: 101)

Poem in memory of Seamus Heaney by Manash Bhattacharjee
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Snowscape (Issue: 101)

It was the tractor he heard first, the low groan of its engine as it laboured across the far slope of the valley towards him; and then, a moment later, the dull clank of the trailer it was towing.
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Any Reasonable Time (Issue: 101)

The third place flash fiction story from NWR's Flash in the Pen competition for a story told in under 100 words.
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Reminiscence (Issue: 101)

The second place flash fiction story from NWR's Flash in the Pen competitio,n for a story told in under 100 words.
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Dressing (Issue: 101)

The first place, prizewinning flash fiction story from NWR's Flash in the Pen competition for a story told in under 100 words.
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Scavenger (Issue: 101)

Short Story preview by Robert Minhinnick from his new prose collection, Island of Lightning (Seren), publishing in October 2013.
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Pebbles (Issue: 101)

I knew everything about the war; knew all about the religious fighting with bricks and fists, and falling in love with girls on the other side.
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Wallpaper Samples from The Rivalry of Flowers (Issue: 101)

Shani Rhys James, who turned sixty this summer, is one of Britain’s landmark figurative painters, particularly in terms of autobiographical art.
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Borderline (Issue: 100)

Jeremy Hughes’ memoir of train journeys in Wales, Asturias and Galicia
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The Anatomy of a Beating (Issue: 100)

It’s one of those times of the day when my abs disappear under the swell from being twelve hundred calories heavier post-workout. But I can still get away with an extra small T-shirt, as long as I breathe in.
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Extract from The Rice Paper Diaries (Issue: 100)

'Where have you come from?' he asked me gently, reaching for his pen.
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Tokyo Spaces (Issue: 100)

I arrived in Setagaya to a flat I had rented unseen.
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The Tapas Machine (Issue: 100)

he thought it odd, but if the woman wanted him to take the CD player out of her car & replace it with a tapas machine then who was he to argue.
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Lifeboat (Issue: 100)

You hear, on the slight breeze, the tunt tunt tunt, tunt tunt before you see the boat. A low craft, inflatable, orange, a few yards out from shore. You feel illicit.
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A Perfect Queen (Issue: 100)

I look for Mama even though I know she is never here when I come home from school.
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Boa Constrictor (Issue: 100)

Today I feel as though I've known Alun Richards my entire life, though I never met him.
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My Mary Jane (Issue: 100)

...all foot fetishism begins with that early calibration by the Clarks woman: the placing of the socked foot gently on the gauge and the coasting of the wooden marker down through the ages until it hits the big toe.
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New Man, Neuman (Issue: 100)

It’s not known for certain whether it was Jacobo himself, or maybe his father, maybe his grandfather. But Jacobo’s surname, my own surname, came about through trickery.
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Oedipus Rex (Issue: 99)

‘Oedipus Rex’ by João Morais was shortlisted in April 2013 for the Percy French Prize for Comic Poetry.
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Lake Story (Issue: 99)

An exclusive preview from Mary-Ann Constantine's forthcoming second collection of short stories All The Souls which will be published by Seren in the spring.
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Shapes and Pieces (Issue: 99)

A response to Richard Hughes' A High Wind in Jamaica
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Beyond the Barren Lands (Issue: 99)

Brigend's 'Suicide Spate': poetry by Zoë Brigley and photography by Nathan Roach
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Walking in Moonlight (Issue: 98)

Poem
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Portraits (Issue: 98)

Poem
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Quotidian Joe vs The Quantum Letterbox (Issue: 98)

Poem
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The Death of Doc Emmett Brown in Back to the Future (Issue: 98)

Poem
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Emmeline (Issue: 98)

An extract from Maria's novel Emmeline
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Obituaries (Issue: 98)

Zillah Bethell lives in south Wales. Her first two novels, Seahorses Are Real and Le Temps des Cerises, are published by Seren. She is currently working on her latest book, Woman in a Dandelion Paperweight.
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According to Adrian (Issue: 98)

A response to The Dead of Night: The Ghost Stories of Oliver Onions
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Like a Breaking of Waters (Issue: 98)

Poem
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Tagged Turnstone, St Ives (Issue: 98)

Poem
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For the tiny insect casting a long shadow across the page of a Burton Watson translation of Ch’i-Chi (Issue: 98)

Poem
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If I Answer, We’ll Crash (Issue: 98)


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West (Issue: 97)

Poem.
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Moving South at Seven (Issue: 97)

Poem.
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No Pets Allowed (Issue: 97)

Poem.
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At the Fitness Centre (Issue: 97)

Poem.
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Arendt (Issue: 97)

Poem
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Berkeley Fudge with the Luna Trio (Issue: 97)

Poetry.
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Lost Ordinance, Sussex, 1943 (Issue: 97)


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Evel Knievel Jumps Over My Family (Issue: 97)


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Margaret River Sestets (Issue: 97)

Winner of the 2012 Cardiff International Poetry Competition.
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What a Way to Go (Issue: 97)

Extract from forthcoming novel What a Way to Go
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British Story (Issue: 97)

An extract from forthcoming novelBritish Story
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Persistence (Issue: 97)

A response to William Condry's A Welsh Country Diary.
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Poems from Deep Field (Issue: 96)

Three poems: Seep, Jacob's Island, Coming of Age
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Sheep Get Inquisitive After a Meteor Strike, Stanbury Moor (Issue: 96)

New poetry.
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Three Poems (Issue: 96)

Three new poems from Carrie Etter: Proportion, Fat, Heroin Song
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Eric 'n' Ernie (Issue: 96)

‘What d’you think of it so far?’ Asks the little one with the hairy legs. ‘Rubbish!’ says the other.
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On Mohammed Farid Street (Issue: 96)

A response to David M Beddoe’s The Lost Mameluke, A Tale of Egypt.
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Hillside (Issue: 96)

New poetry
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Winter Arriving Early (Issue: 96)

New poetry.
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Nothing but (Issue: 95)

Poetry
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Rainer Maria Rilke, from Sonnets to Orpheus (Issue: 95)

Extract from Martyn Crucefix's forthcoming translation.
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Out the Back (Issue: 95)

New Poetry
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Extracts from the Diaries of Dyfrig Prydderch, 1936 (Issue: 95)

In the 1930S, welshman Dyfrig Prydderch lived in Romania, travelling there and recording his impressions of life in the country.
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Cruel Train (Issue: r23)

An extract from this pacey novella by Christine Harrison about control, pursuit and incarceration, set in west Wales and Cardiff, an entry in the New Welsh Writing Awards 2017 AmeriCymru Prize for the Novella
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The Magpie Tree (Issue: r22)

An exclusive extract from The Magpie Tree by Katherine Stansfield, published by Allison and Busby on 22 March
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Action versus inertia (Issue: r13)

Or what to do when nature puts you at the centre of one of its stories by C M Buckland
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Un-named Water Bodies (Issue: r16)

An exclusive extract from Tristan Hughes’ novel, Hummingbird, published by Parthian next month
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The Trees Won’t Tell (Issue: r18)

Cherish D Smith’s novella extract explores first- and summer-love, aspiration and black teenage pregnancy in 1930s USA
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