In an essay in the current issue of New Welsh Reader [Issue 124], I confessed to my obsession with hares. And I drew on Jane Russ’ The Hare Book for information, particularly about the poet William Cowper’s three pet hares, Bess, Tiney and Puss. I also have a love of hedgehogs, who have sometimes nested […]
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My Mother Taught Me How Sing and Graveyards in My Closet

Alex Diggins find that these two creative radio pieces, an unabashed celebration of sound, music, motherhood and fulfilling Charlotte Church dreams, are epic as well as bang up to date

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Welsh boys and their mothers, eh? A cup of milky tea, a hunk of barabrith and mammy’s becardiganed cwtch – these have a Proustian ability to melt the …

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Kidnapped by my Father: BBC One Wales

Chris Moss hails an honest, crafted and true documentary about an indomitable Cardiff woman, a first-hand account of why immigration happens, and the long stories behind every tearful airport reunion

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Yemen is one of the world’s shadowlands. We only see it on the news, usually under a pall of smoke after mortars or aerial bombings. It’s a source of …

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What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About #MeToo: Essays on Sex, Authority and the Mess of Life

Luanne Thornton concludes that Wypijewski’s essay collection is bold in its discussion of love, brutality, sex, capitalism and the profiteers of scandal entertainment

PUBLISHED ON: 27/08/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

With extensive experience in journalism and editing at the Nation, the American author seeks out her own topics of interest in this exciting insight i …

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We Could Be Anywhere by Now

Katherine Stansfield’s latest poetry collection is a perceptive, humorous exploration of identity, language, and the boons and pitfalls of relationships, Luanne Thornton writes

PUBLISHED ON: 20/08/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

The poems in Katherine Stanfield’s second collection bristle with curiosity and the desire to understand the world through personal experience. Embedd …

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Just So You Know: Essays of Experience

Jacob Powell finds that these essays on difference and sameness redefine notions of centre, periphery and Welshness, all in a highly positive way

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

What does it mean to be marginalised? While the term itself is eschewed by some contributors, this is the question that the essay collection Just So Y …

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Pondweed

This is a sparkling, funny novel, largely successful in honouring the complexities of late-flowering love, writes Mandy Sutter

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

When pond salesman Selwyn comes home one afternoon towing his firm’s exhibition caravan and tells his ‘like-wife’ Ginny to get into the car, all she c …

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Early Twentieth-century Welsh Plays in English, Vol 1: ‘A Dirty Broth’

Chris Moss assesses how this anthology of classic plays (including Taffy by Caradoc Evans) identifies the factors that deprived Wales of a recognisable tradition of playwriting and how these three plays share themes of religion, community, identity and family

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

The first volume of a two-book series devoted to Welsh writing for the theatre,  A Dirty Broth, contains the complete texts of just three plays. You m …

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Saints and Lodgers: Poems of WH Davies

Chris Moss identifies something of Newport in the original Supertramp who belonged to no poetry school

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

I am the Poet Davies, William, I sin without a blush or blink: I am a man that lives to eat; I am a man that lives to drink   Thus, with the easy …

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The Estate Agent’s Daughter

Vicky MacKenzie enjoys the honesty and vim of this second collection but wishes for Rhian Edwards' poems more imaginative flights than they are offered

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Confessional and accessible, Rhian Edwards’ second collection is predominantly grounded in the everyday vocabulary of lived experience. Her themes inc …

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