• Subscribers only

    The Little House

    The little house I visit in my dreams is not the same place where I was born; no, this place is much further from town in an unfamiliar neighbourhood to the east. I thought I’d find this place filled with music, Chinese vases and antique Persian rugs. But in the end, this place had no music, no bust …

    Read more
  • Free content

    Land of Whose Fathers?

    Land is an enigma. It is soil, roads, houses and mountains, but more than any or all of those. It is, in a sense, all we have as humans. It is everywhere. It is, you would think, the planet’s gift to us. Yet access to it and ownership of it are fiercely contested. At the same time, across the United …

    Read more
  • Subscribers only

    A Track in Pentrefelin

    I call it a track – it’s a lane – because I feel like a pilgrim every time I go up it from my partner’s farmhouse, Cefnymeysydd Isaf, which is hidden away amid a woodland of oak and ash. In 2019, we made a book of my poems and his watercolour paintings, which was titled Wild Land because that’s what …

    Read more
  • Subscribers only

    Skimming a Stone

    I am at the stony beach by the river with both sons. They are old enough not to be eating stones anymore. They have a net to fish for fish, and for stones and are a babble of river, fish and stones. I find a stone ground smooth. I turn it in my fingers, feel its heft in my palm. A bunch of people al …

    Read more
  • Subscribers only

    Your Still Beating Heart

    Criminality proves just the tonic for grief in Tyler Keevil’s impressive thriller Your Still Beating Heart. In its opening pages, the heroine, Eira, loses her husband Tod – aged thirty-one, she is widowed. Except, as she herself reflects, the words ‘loses’ and ‘widow’ are perhaps too vague, too gent …

    Read more
  • Subscribers only

    Tutankhamun’s Wet Nurse Imagines Herself as the Goddess Nut

    stars in my hair                   dragonflies padding each shoulder      a blue mole cuddles each toe           I hold two worlds together                                       two sons i let one go                             each evening back to the rich rooms           rich on me each night i hi …

    Read more

Explore the latest from the New Welsh Review

Practice

Poem about social distancing as a metaphor of divided loyalty, by Elisabeth McKetta

PUBLISHED ON: 01/04/21

CATEGORY: Poetry

For seventy days we practised at home all forms of being safe: the short, masked walks, the long hand washes, the being as self- contained as the sun. …

Read more

The Sheriff of Geneva

Alex Diggins wants to gorge on this darkly delicious crime caper set in the fast world of gourmet burgers and Venezuelan gold, but finds that the saucepans ultimately run dry

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Yes, Chef! The spitting tension and steamy press of a professional kitchen is fertile creative ground. Hard-boozing, hard-bonking and filthy-mouthed – …

Read more

The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti

Ian Cutler on a reverse travelogue/social archaeological survey of Los Angeles’ marginalised visitors and inhabitants, from hobos to taggers

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

  The text and prolific illustrations that make up The City Beneath provides a hundred-year cultural history of Los Angeles and its environs, fro …

Read more

Reflections: Preview of the photography book, Form

Paul Cabuts on the influence of Walker Evans’ American Photographs on his own Valleys images, and the interplay of social disadvantage and monochrome

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Essays, Preview

A night class at the old school on top of Stow Hill in Trefforest would prove decisive. I had already experienced years of taking photographs, learnin …

Read more

Pier Closing Time

Chris Moss, mulls on the mixed legacy of the British seaside that this wonderful collection evokes, and concludes that the artiness of monochrome, a world away from Instagram, gives us poetry as well as social realism

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

There is no such thing as realism. Photographers might choose to capture the gritty, the depressing, the down at heel, but they do so by selection, by …

Read more

The Tall Owl and Other Stories

Gwen Davies notes that this debut story collection on art, community and estrangement, finds its place in the fairy tale tradition, the oldest and most powerful form of storytelling

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

Ed Garland’s book of criticism, bibliotherapy and memoir, Earwitness, which New Welsh Review published in 2019, raised my awareness of the neglected s …

Read more

In the Sweep of the Bay

Gwen Davies admires the craft of this homage to David Constantine’s ‘Tea at the Midland’, set in Morecambe Bay, in which time, trauma and healing become the author’s recurrent themes

PUBLISHED ON: 23/02/21

CATEGORY: Reviews

The woman behind plate glass could not have been in their thoughts, they were not performing to impress and entertain her. Far out, they rode on the w …

Read more

Green in Black

As a tribute to the late, great Cicely Tyson, Daniel G Williams writes about the African-American attraction to Emlyn Williams' film The Corn is Green, in which Ms Tyson appeared as Miss Moffat in a 1983 NYC revival

PUBLISHED ON: 03/02/21

CATEGORY: Essays

As a tribute to Cecily Tyson, who died on 28 January 2021, we re-publish this article from New Welsh Review 86, winter 2009. The year 2009 has seen a …

Read more