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    The Rhino Conspiracy

    The Rhino Conspiracy by Peter Hain is a dynamic, fast-paced thriller based in apartheid South Africa. It is emotional and compelling, educational and knowledgeable, exciting and bold; and it has to be one of the best books I have read this year. The British education system seems to completely gloss …

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    Retired

    When my parents went back to their roots, to low ceilinged views of a pub with ducks, a shop, a Cotswold stone church, painstakingly restored   they found their kind long gone. I see them in a neighbour’s lounge among devotees of sipping of dispensing conversation in morsels.   Mum bears h …

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    The eighteenth year of us

    The clementine rise of new acquaintance: you were all lilt, all eye-bright charm – the dance of an autumn. And the fire breathed yes and now and I want something the seasons cannot deny – a burnish that looks like flame but is dying embers. We relit at Christmas, your wind-rapped cheeks told me stic …

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    Return Journey

     ‘Hullo?’ the call connects as a child screams through the funnel of the carriage. ‘It’s me,’ I say. a man pulls the armrest down ‘I got your message.’   treads   on the side   of my foot.   ‘Uh-okay,’ you say, I stare out   ‘sorry.’   someone rips   a window open   ‘There’s been a delay.’   ‘What? …

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    Man-eyes

    Get your gross man-eyes off my poem with your numb-drum dumbing literal mind behind which hides no sincerity. My ma had a hundred times your brains but sat and smoked them stupid at a table in the suburbs: foxes, jam tarts and no travelcard. Back then, if you wanted a train, you bought a ticket. Not …

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    The Hare Book and The Hedgehog Book

    In an essay in the current issue of New Welsh Reader [Issue 124], I confessed to my obsession with hares. And I drew on Jane Russ’ The Hare Book for information, particularly about the poet William Cowper’s three pet hares, Bess, Tiney and Puss. I also have a love of hedgehogs, who have sometimes ne …

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Explore the latest from the New Welsh Review

My Mother Taught Me How to Sing and Graveyards in My Closet

Alex Diggins find that these two creative radio pieces, an unabashed celebration of sound, music, motherhood and fulfilling Charlotte Church dreams, are epic as well as bang up to date

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Welsh boys and their mothers, eh? A cup of milky tea, a hunk of barabrith and mammy’s becardiganed cwtch – these have a Proustian ability to melt the …

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Kidnapped by my Father: BBC One Wales

Chris Moss hails an honest, crafted and true documentary about an indomitable Cardiff woman, a first-hand account of why immigration happens, and the long stories behind every tearful airport reunion

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

Yemen is one of the world’s shadowlands. We only see it on the news, usually under a pall of smoke after mortars or aerial bombings. It’s a source of …

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Plague Dreams of the Future City

The metropolis is being whipped by the long tail of Covid-19. Chris Moss envisions the death of the megacity

PUBLISHED ON: 29/09/20

CATEGORY: Column

Plagues kill citizens. They reconfigure cities. An outbreak of yellow fever in Buenos Aires in 1871 emptied the southern districts of wealthy resident …

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What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About #MeToo: Essays on Sex, Authority and the Mess of Life

Luanne Thornton concludes that Wypijewski’s essay collection is bold in its discussion of love, brutality, sex, capitalism and the profiteers of scandal entertainment

PUBLISHED ON: 27/08/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

With extensive experience in journalism and editing at the Nation, the American author seeks out her own topics of interest in this exciting insight i …

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We Could Be Anywhere by Now

Katherine Stansfield’s latest poetry collection is a perceptive, humorous exploration of identity, language, and the boons and pitfalls of relationships, Luanne Thornton writes

PUBLISHED ON: 20/08/20

CATEGORY: Reviews

The poems in Katherine Stanfield’s second collection bristle with curiosity and the desire to understand the world through personal experience. Embedd …

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Telling your father at Bwlch Nant yr Arian

Poem by Mari Ellis Dunning

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

                  We’re going to have a baby, I told your father, just days since I’d felt his ribs slot like coins between mine. We were toeing a mou …

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Rivers Joining

Poem by Graham Mort

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

Freshwater mussels, coffee bean brown, cleaned by oyster catchers that jostle where the Wenning brunts the Lune. We gaze upstream at the Howgills, the …

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Algorithm

PUBLISHED ON: 28/07/20

CATEGORY: Poetry

i.m. Michael Wessells   The phone rings because Michael has died. I saw him yesterday and said goodbye as he passed behind me, tall, gathering hi …

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