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    The Half-Life of Snails

    Sisters Helen and Jennifer live in the shadow of Wylfa Nuclear Power Station. Growing up in a sheep-farming family on the north coast of Anglesey, Wylfa has loomed in the distance throughout their lives. The station is a felt presence in The Half-Life of Snails, an unmistakable part of the landscape …

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    Secular, Scriptural or the Heavenly Host: 6 Angel Rules

    Truman Capote, it is said, wrote like an angel. Is there a higher compliment? Writing like an angel is synonymous with ease, with perfection of sound and sense. But, my experience of writing a story with an angel at its centre (‘Anna and the Angel’ won third place in this year’s New Welsh Writing Aw …

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    Brittle with Relics: A History of Wales 1962–1997

    Interviewing people is not as easy as good writers make it appear. You have to ask the right people the right questions. You have to corral and connive to tease out sentences worthy of a reader, of a quotation. You have to transcribe, trash, edit, collate and curate some kind of narrative from the B …

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    Rivers of Wales

    Jim Perrin follows streams to the lowlands in his new book, Rivers of Wales. It is easy to be swept away in its strong currents of folklore, to tumble through the literary cascade of writers and to float gently to the sea in its verdant cultural landscape. In many ways, it is a stream of literary co …

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    The Dossier: Miscarriages of Justice in South Wales 1982–2016

    No police officer has been brought to book for their part in these cases, despite the evidence behind the convictions being judged unsafe.   I had to take a long, hot shower when I finished this book. After 196 pages of pure human torment, I felt awful. No, not awful. Dirty, that’s how I felt. …

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    The Herring Man

    Stories should not die… They ought to be remembered by someone, somewhere, somehow. And with this quote, the theme and tone of this book is established. The reader is introduced to Gwyn Evans, grandson of Samuel Evans (Sam the Herring Man, as he is known to his neighbors). Sailor, fisherman, expert …

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Explore the latest from the New Welsh Review

The Green Indian Problem, The Blue Book of Nebo

Tim Cooke admires two novels that make innovative use of epistolary forms written from the point of view of children, both firmly rooted in their Welsh locations and exploring themes of identity, change and the mother–child relationship

PUBLISHED ON: 28/06/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Writing in the first person from a child’s perspective is fraught with difficulty. Achieving an authentic language, delivering realistic insights and …

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We Have to Leave the Earth

T. K. Quentin finds this collection on climate change, parenthood and feminist activism to be well-crafted, but takes issue with the attitudes towards autism that some of the poems suggest

PUBLISHED ON: 08/06/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Award-winning poet, academic and editor Carolyn Jess-Cooke explores climate change, parenthood and feminist activism in her new collection, We Have to …

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The Sound of Being Human: How Music Shapes our Lives

Ed Garland finds fascinating this tour through the musical past, which is also a poignant account of loss

PUBLISHED ON: 28/04/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

The Museum of Portable Sound will bring you into contact with an extensive collection of strange sonic entities. You can listen to an old MiniDisc pla …

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In Praise of Marc Almond, True Advocate of World Culture

Shara Atashi on Marc Almond’s cultural internationalism and his mentor and muse, Vadim Kozin

PUBLISHED ON: 27/04/22

CATEGORY: Column

Beyond a community of devoted fans who follow his footsteps everywhere, a valuable, even precious side to Marc Almond’s work remains a little-known se …

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Four Dervishes

Özgür Uyanık admires this assured and beguiling debut novel about the power of story in relation to culture: its survival and its renewal, by a polyglot whose love of languages and Eastern literature shines

PUBLISHED ON: 27/04/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Four Dervishes is Welsh–Pakistani writer and teacher Hammad Rind’s debut novel. He is a polyglot whose love of languages and Eastern literature shines …

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The Village

Chris Moss finds here a text littered with historical nuggets and quotidian anecdotes challenging or confirming stereotypes about ‘the village’, while black and white photography turns the humdrum into art or social history

PUBLISHED ON: 27/04/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

Cities are hip. Towns are gritty. Hamlets are romantic. Capitals are – snooty accent coming – capital. Villages are problematic. What do you think of …

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Welsh [Plural]:Essays on the Future of Wales

Chris Moss can see how Wales’ pluralist, multicultural present rubs awkwardly against its imagined past, making this prose collection’s brief a teaser: can Wales be both distinct and inclusive?

PUBLISHED ON: 27/04/22

CATEGORY: Reviews

This snazzy-looking book is subtitled Essays on the Future of Wales, but many of the nineteen short pieces collected therein are bits of memoir, diary …

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Planet Blues

PUBLISHED ON: 26/04/22

CATEGORY: Essays, Feature length, Reviews, review-essay

It’s early winter. I’ve just been for a walk in a field. It’s part of the large estate that surrounds my home – a rented, retired 1830s farmhouse – an …

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